Robert Browning, (UK), was called the father of modern poetry by Thomas Hardy, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound.  He the voice of optimism during the otherwise pessimistic tone of the Victorian era.  His fairytale marriage to Elizabeth Barrett was an example to a pessimistic world that true romance is possible.

I trust in God,—the right shall be the right And other than the wrong, while he endures. I trust in my own soul, that can perceive The outward and the inward,—Nature’s good And God’s.
A Soul’s Tragedy (1846), Act. i.

There is an inmost center in us all,  Where truth abides in fullness; and around,  Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in,  This perfect, clear perception— which is truth.  A baffling and perverting carnal mesh  Binds it, and makes all error: and, to know,  Rather consists in opening out a way.  Whence the imprisoned splendor may escape,  Than in effecting entry for a light  Supposed to be without. Watch narrowly  The demonstration of a truth, its birth,  And you trace back the effluence to its spring  And source within us; where broods radiance vast,  To be elicited ray by ray.     James Henry Snowden, (1911).  The World a Spiritual System: an Outline of Metaphysics.  New York: The Macmillan Co., p. xiii

I have my own church equally:  And in this church my faith sprang first!  (I said, as I reached the rising ground,  And the wind began again, with a burst  Of rain in my face, and a glad rebound  From the heart beneath, as if, God speeding me,  I entered his church-door, nature leading me)  —In youth I looked to these very skies,  And probing their immensities,  I found God there, his visible power; Yet felt in my heart, amid all its sense  Of the power, an equal evidence  That his love, there too, was the nobler dower.  For the loving worm within its clod,  Were diviner than a loveless god  

Robert Browning, Sir Frederic George Kenyon, (1912).  The Works of Robert Browning: Volume 4.  London: Smith & Elder Co., Boston: R. H. Hinkley Co., p. 11

Robert Browning, (UK), was called the father of modern poetry by Thomas Hardy, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound.  He the voice of optimism during the otherwise pessimistic tone of the Victorian era.  His fairytale marriage to Elizabeth Barrett was an example to a pessimistic world that true romance is possible.

I trust in God,—the right shall be the right
And other than the wrong, while he endures.
I trust in my own soul, that can perceive
The outward and the inward,—Nature’s good
And God’s.

A Soul’s Tragedy (1846), Act. i.

There is an inmost center in us all,
Where truth abides in fullness; and around,
Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in,
This perfect, clear perception— which is truth.
A baffling and perverting carnal mesh
Binds it, and makes all error: and, to know,
Rather consists in opening out a way.
Whence the imprisoned splendor may escape,
Than in effecting entry for a light
Supposed to be without. Watch narrowly
The demonstration of a truth, its birth,
And you trace back the effluence to its spring
And source within us; where broods radiance vast,
To be elicited ray by ray.   
James Henry Snowden, (1911).  The World a Spiritual System: an Outline of Metaphysics.  New York: The Macmillan Co., p. xiii

I have my own church equally:
And in this church my faith sprang first!
(I said, as I reached the rising ground,
And the wind began again, with a burst
Of rain in my face, and a glad rebound
From the heart beneath, as if, God speeding me,
I entered his church-door, nature leading me)
—In youth I looked to these very skies,
And probing their immensities,
I found God there, his visible power;
Yet felt in my heart, amid all its sense
Of the power, an equal evidence
That his love, there too, was the nobler dower.
For the loving worm within its clod,
Were diviner than a loveless god
 

Robert Browning, Sir Frederic George Kenyon, (1912).  The Works of Robert Browning: Volume 4.  London: Smith & Elder Co., Boston: R. H. Hinkley Co., p. 11

Robert Browning, (UK), was called the father of modern poetry by Thomas Hardy, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound.  He the voice of optimism during the otherwise pessimistic tone of the Victorian era.  His fairytale marriage to Elizabeth Barrett was an example to a pessimistic world that true romance is possible.

I trust in God,—the right shall be the right And other than the wrong, while he endures. I trust in my own soul, that can perceive The outward and the inward,—Nature’s good And God’s.
A Soul’s Tragedy (1846), Act. i.

There is an inmost center in us all,  Where truth abides in fullness; and around,  Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in,  This perfect, clear perception— which is truth.  A baffling and perverting carnal mesh  Binds it, and makes all error: and, to know,  Rather consists in opening out a way.  Whence the imprisoned splendor may escape,  Than in effecting entry for a light  Supposed to be without. Watch narrowly  The demonstration of a truth, its birth,  And you trace back the effluence to its spring  And source within us; where broods radiance vast,  To be elicited ray by ray.     James Henry Snowden, (1911).  The World a Spiritual System: an Outline of Metaphysics.  New York: The Macmillan Co., p. xiii

I have my own church equally:  And in this church my faith sprang first!  (I said, as I reached the rising ground,  And the wind began again, with a burst  Of rain in my face, and a glad rebound  From the heart beneath, as if, God speeding me,  I entered his church-door, nature leading me)  —In youth I looked to these very skies,  And probing their immensities,  I found God there, his visible power; Yet felt in my heart, amid all its sense  Of the power, an equal evidence  That his love, there too, was the nobler dower.  For the loving worm within its clod,  Were diviner than a loveless god  

Robert Browning, Sir Frederic George Kenyon, (1912).  The Works of Robert Browning: Volume 4.  London: Smith & Elder Co., Boston: R. H. Hinkley Co., p. 11

Robert Browning, (UK), was called the father of modern poetry by Thomas Hardy, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound.  He the voice of optimism during the otherwise pessimistic tone of the Victorian era.  His fairytale marriage to Elizabeth Barrett was an example to a pessimistic world that true romance is possible.

I trust in God,—the right shall be the right
And other than the wrong, while he endures.
I trust in my own soul, that can perceive
The outward and the inward,—Nature’s good
And God’s.

A Soul’s Tragedy (1846), Act. i.

There is an inmost center in us all,
Where truth abides in fullness; and around,
Wall upon wall, the gross flesh hems it in,
This perfect, clear perception— which is truth.
A baffling and perverting carnal mesh
Binds it, and makes all error: and, to know,
Rather consists in opening out a way.
Whence the imprisoned splendor may escape,
Than in effecting entry for a light
Supposed to be without. Watch narrowly
The demonstration of a truth, its birth,
And you trace back the effluence to its spring
And source within us; where broods radiance vast,
To be elicited ray by ray.   
James Henry Snowden, (1911).  The World a Spiritual System: an Outline of Metaphysics.  New York: The Macmillan Co., p. xiii

I have my own church equally:
And in this church my faith sprang first!
(I said, as I reached the rising ground,
And the wind began again, with a burst
Of rain in my face, and a glad rebound
From the heart beneath, as if, God speeding me,
I entered his church-door, nature leading me)
—In youth I looked to these very skies,
And probing their immensities,
I found God there, his visible power;
Yet felt in my heart, amid all its sense
Of the power, an equal evidence
That his love, there too, was the nobler dower.
For the loving worm within its clod,
Were diviner than a loveless god
 

Robert Browning, Sir Frederic George Kenyon, (1912).  The Works of Robert Browning: Volume 4.  London: Smith & Elder Co., Boston: R. H. Hinkley Co., p. 11

Robert Boyle, (Ireland), basically pioneered modern chemistry, and the scientific method.  Before this, science was based on logical arguments.  He is perhaps most famous for Boyle’s law, which states that as the volume of a gas is decreased, the pressure increases proportionally. 

God may be said to have taught Men by the secret Motions and Influences of his Holy Spirit upon their Minds.
This the Scriptures do assert throughout; and there is nothing more reasonable to be believed of God, even without a Revelation, than that he who formed our Spirits, should be at all Times ready to influence them in a Way proper to their Make, conversing himself intimately with them, enlightening our Understandings, secretly admonishing and assisting our Souls, according as they apply themselves to him, and become capable of receiving Influence from him.  
 Robert Boyle, Gilbert Burnet, Richard Bentley, (1737). A Defence of Natural and Revealed Religion: Being An Abridgment Of the sermons preached at the lecture founded by the Hon. Robert Boyle, Volume 1. Dublin: S. Powell, for Stearne Brock.  p. 284

Robert Boyle, (Ireland), basically pioneered modern chemistry, and the scientific method.  Before this, science was based on logical arguments.  He is perhaps most famous for Boyle’s law, which states that as the volume of a gas is decreased, the pressure increases proportionally. 

God may be said to have taught Men by the secret Motions and Influences of his Holy Spirit upon their Minds.

This the Scriptures do assert throughout; and there is nothing more reasonable to be believed of God, even without a Revelation, than that he who formed our Spirits, should be at all Times ready to influence them in a Way proper to their Make, conversing himself intimately with them, enlightening our Understandings, secretly admonishing and assisting our Souls, according as they apply themselves to him, and become capable of receiving Influence from him.  

 Robert Boyle, Gilbert Burnet, Richard Bentley, (1737). A Defence of Natural and Revealed Religion: Being An Abridgment Of the sermons preached at the lecture founded by the Hon. Robert Boyle, Volume 1. Dublin: S. Powell, for Stearne Brock.  p. 284

James Clerk Maxwell is most famous for “Maxwell’s equations”, which define how magnetism, electricity, and light behave.  This laid the groundwork for modern physics, in such fields as special relativity and quantum mechanics.  Einstein described Maxwell’s work as the “most profound and the most fruitful that physics has experienced since the time of Newton.”

James Clerk Maxwell is most famous for “Maxwell’s equations”, which define how magnetism, electricity, and light behave.  This laid the groundwork for modern physics, in such fields as special relativity and quantum mechanics.  Einstein described Maxwell’s work as the “most profound and the most fruitful that physics has experienced since the time of Newton.”

Alfred Lord Tennyson, (UK), was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of the Victorian era and continues to be a very popular British poet.  His works on Camelot, King Arthur, and the Knights of the round-table drove the idea of chivalry, courage, and honor into a virtual British national identity.  In “Ulysses” he urges his readers to persevere through hard times, never giving up.  This resolve echoed into the twentieth century with Winston Churchill’s famous “Never give up” determination during World War II.

"This is one of my meanings," he said, "of

Ring in the Christ that is to be:

when Christianity without bigotry will triumph, when the controversies of creeds shall have vanished, and Shall bear false witness, each of each, no more,
But find their limits by that larger light,
And overstep them, moving easily
Thro’ after-ages in the Love of Truth,
The truth of Love”
Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.  New York: The Macmillan Co. p. 326

He wrote: “A kind of waking trance I have frequently had, quite up from boyhood, when I have been all alone. This has generally come upon me thro’ repeating my own name two or three times to myself silently, till all at once, as it were out of the intensity of the consciousness of individuality, the individuality itself seemed to dissolve and fade away into boundless being, and this not a confused state, but the clearest of the clearest, the surest of the surest, the weirdest of the weirdest, utterly beyond words, where death was an almost laughable impossibility, the loss of personality (if so it were) seeming no extinction but the only true life.” “This might,” he said, “be the state which St. Paul describes, ‘Whether in the body I cannot tell, or whether out of the body I cannot tell.’” He continued: “I am ashamed of my feeble description, Have I not said the state is utterly beyond words? But in a moment, when I come back to my normal state of ‘sanity,’ I am ready to fight for my life, and hold that it will last for eons of eons.”Ibid., p. 320

About prayer he said “The reason why men find it hard to regard prayer in the same light in which it was formerly regarded is, that we seem to know more of the unchangeableness of Law, but I believe that God reveals Himself in each individual soul. Prayer is, to take a mundane simile, like opening a sluice between the great ocean and our little channels when the great sea gathers itself together and flows in at full tide.” “Prayer on our part is the highest aspiration of the soul.”
Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.Ibid., p. 324

Speak to Him thou for He hears, and Spirit with Spirit can meet—Closer is He than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet.ibid., p. 325

Alfred Lord Tennyson, (UK), was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of the Victorian era and continues to be a very popular British poet.  His works on Camelot, King Arthur, and the Knights of the round-table drove the idea of chivalry, courage, and honor into a virtual British national identity.  In “Ulysses” he urges his readers to persevere through hard times, never giving up.  This resolve echoed into the twentieth century with Winston Churchill’s famous “Never give up” determination during World War II.

"This is one of my meanings," he said, "of

Ring in the Christ that is to be:

when Christianity without bigotry will triumph, when the controversies of creeds shall have vanished, and Shall bear false witness, each of each, no more,

But find their limits by that larger light,

And overstep them, moving easily

Thro’ after-ages in the Love of Truth,

The truth of Love”

Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.  New York: The Macmillan Co. p. 326

He wrote: “A kind of waking trance I have frequently had, quite up from boyhood, when I have been all alone. This has generally come upon me thro’ repeating my own name two or three times to myself silently, till all at once, as it were out of the intensity of the consciousness of individuality, the individuality itself seemed to dissolve and fade away into boundless being, and this not a confused state, but the clearest of the clearest, the surest of the surest, the weirdest of the weirdest, utterly beyond words, where death was an almost laughable impossibility, the loss of personality (if so it were) seeming no extinction but the only true life.” “This might,” he said, “be the state which St. Paul describes, ‘Whether in the body I cannot tell, or whether out of the body I cannot tell.’” He continued: “I am ashamed of my feeble description, Have I not said the state is utterly beyond words? But in a moment, when I come back to my normal state of ‘sanity,’ I am ready to fight for my life, and hold that it will last for eons of eons.”
Ibid., p. 320

About prayer he said “The reason why men find it hard to regard prayer in the same light in which it was formerly regarded is, that we seem to know more of the unchangeableness of Law, but I believe that God reveals Himself in each individual soul. Prayer is, to take a mundane simile, like opening a sluice between the great ocean and our little channels when the great sea gathers itself together and flows in at full tide.” “Prayer on our part is the highest aspiration of the soul.”

Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.
Ibid., p. 324

Speak to Him thou for He hears, and Spirit with Spirit can meet—Closer is He than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet.
ibid., p. 325

Durante Alighieri, (Italy), was a major poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy is widely considered to be one of the greatest works of world literature.  At first glance, the poem describes Dante’s travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, but on a deeper level, it describes the soul’s journey towards Heaven.

Durante Alighieri, (Italy), was a major poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy is widely considered to be one of the greatest works of world literature.  At first glance, the poem describes Dante’s travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, but on a deeper level, it describes the soul’s journey towards Heaven.

Pablo Picasso was one of the most influential artist of the twentieth century. He pioneered Cubism, co-invented collage and made major contributions to Surrealism and Symbolism.  He also used his art to promote peace and nonviolence, as in the mural “Guernica” he painted in 1937.

When I work, I leave my body outside the door, the way the Moslems take off their shoes before they enter a mosque.

Andy Zubko, (2003). Treasury Of Spiritual Wisdom A Collection Of 10,000 Powerful Quotations For Transforming Your Life. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishing. p. 498

Pablo Picasso was one of the most influential artist of the twentieth century. He pioneered Cubism, co-invented collage and made major contributions to Surrealism and Symbolism.  He also used his art to promote peace and nonviolence, as in the mural “Guernica” he painted in 1937.

When I work, I leave my body outside the door, the way the Moslems take off their shoes before they enter a mosque.

Andy Zubko, (2003). Treasury Of Spiritual Wisdom A Collection Of 10,000 Powerful Quotations For Transforming Your Life. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishing. p. 498

Bach influenced both Beethoven and Mozart. “Study Bach, there you will find everything.” – Brahms. “In Bach the vital cells of music are united as the world is in God.” – Mahler. “Playing and studying Bach convinces us that we are all numbskulls.” – Schumann.

Bach’s commentary on 1 Chron 28:21
Behold the hierarchy of the priests and Levites for all the services in the house of God, they are with you in all the work and are willing and able for all services as are the princes and the people for all your dealings. (which you will grasp.) It is clear however, from this divine model, and from all prophetic direction of David, that he has accomplished nothing through his own works, in the building and management of the temple, and the worship service, but rather through the model that the Lord has placed before him in his spirit, in every respect and according to the dealings of service in whatever manner God has placed them in his heart.  For one serves God in vain with willful or selfish services.  God prescribes, carves out, calculates and arranges everything for us, and thus explains His will how He wants to be respected by us; therefore, in matters of religion we should presume and do nothing without His revealed word.

Johann Sebastian Bach, Abraham Calov, Howard H. Cox, (1985).  The Calov Bible.  Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press.  p. 418

Bach influenced both Beethoven and Mozart. “Study Bach, there you will find everything.” – Brahms. “In Bach the vital cells of music are united as the world is in God.” – Mahler. “Playing and studying Bach convinces us that we are all numbskulls.” – Schumann.

Bach’s commentary on 1 Chron 28:21

Behold the hierarchy of the priests and Levites for all the services in the house of God, they are with you in all the work and are willing and able for all services as are the princes and the people for all your dealings. (which you will grasp.) It is clear however, from this divine model, and from all prophetic direction of David, that he has accomplished nothing through his own works, in the building and management of the temple, and the worship service, but rather through the model that the Lord has placed before him in his spirit, in every respect and according to the dealings of service in whatever manner God has placed them in his heart.  For one serves God in vain with willful or selfish services.  God prescribes, carves out, calculates and arranges everything for us, and thus explains His will how He wants to be respected by us; therefore, in matters of religion we should presume and do nothing without His revealed word.

Johann Sebastian Bach, Abraham Calov, Howard H. Cox, (1985).  The Calov Bible.  Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press.  p. 418

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (Switzerland / France), was an epic game-changer influencing much of our modern-day culture such as: the rise of democracy and the fall of monarchy, (rule by kings), citizenship, private property, education, and literary romanticism during a time very different from ours.  His Discourse on the Origin of Inequality was the Hunger Games of his day.
Our passions are the principal instruments of our conservation, and it is therefore an attempt as vain as it is ridiculous to wish to destroy them; it would be to control Nature and reform the work of God. If God were to tell man to destroy the passions which he has given him, God would and would not, he would contradict himself. But he has never given this senseless order; nothing like it is written in the human heart; and whatever God wishes a man to do he does not cause it to be told to him by another man, but he says it to him himself, he writes it in the depths of his heart.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Payne. (1909).  Rousseau’s Emile.  New York: D. Appleton & Company.  p. 193

Such is the condition of a soul that daring to propose itself to you as a model, is only offering you the fruit of your efforts in doing so. If that interior voice that judges me in secret and ceaselessly makes itself heard in my heart, makes itself heard in the same way in yours, learn to listen to it and follow it, learn to draw your foremost goods from yourself;  they are the only ones that do not depend on fortune at all [and] can take the place of the others. That is my entire philosophy and, I believe, the entire art of being happy that is feasible to man.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Christopher Kelly, Rousseau on Philosophy, Morality, and Religion. (2007).  Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England. p. 91

One speaks about the cry of remorse that punishes hidden crimes in secret, and so often makes them public. Alas! Who among us has never known that intrusive voice?  One speaks from experience and one would like to erase this involuntary feeling that gives us so many torments. But let us obey nature, we shall know with what sweetness it approves what it has commanded and what charm one finds in tasting the internal peace of a soul satisfied with itself.  The wicked man fears and flees himself, he cheers himself up by throwing himself outside of himself, he directs his anxious eyes around him and seeks an object that makes him laugh, without insulting ridicule he would always be sad:  on the contrary, the serenity of the just man is internal; his laughter is not from malignity but from joy, he bears its source inside himself.  He is as cheerful by himself as he is in the midst of a social circle; and he does not draw that unfailing contentment that one sees reigning in him from those who draw near him, he imparts it to them.  
Ibid., p. 92-93

Conscience, conscience, divine instinct, immortal and celestial voice; assured guide of a being that is ignorant and limited but intelligent and free, in judge of good and evil, sublime emanation of the eternal substance, which makes man similar to the Gods;  it is you alone that makes up the excellence of my nature.
Without you I feel nothing in myself that raises me above the beasts, except for the sad privilege of leading myself astray from errors to errors with the aid of an understanding without rule and a reason without principle.

Ibid., p. 95-96

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (Switzerland / France), was an epic game-changer influencing much of our modern-day culture such as: the rise of democracy and the fall of monarchy, (rule by kings), citizenship, private property, education, and literary romanticism during a time very different from ours.  His Discourse on the Origin of Inequality was the Hunger Games of his day.

Our passions are the principal instruments of our conservation, and it is therefore an attempt as vain as it is ridiculous to wish to destroy them; it would be to control Nature and reform the work of God. If God were to tell man to destroy the passions which he has given him, God would and would not, he would contradict himself. But he has never given this senseless order; nothing like it is written in the human heart; and whatever God wishes a man to do he does not cause it to be told to him by another man, but he says it to him himself, he writes it in the depths of his heart.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Payne. (1909).  Rousseau’s Emile.  New York: D. Appleton & Company.  p. 193

Such is the condition of a soul that daring to propose itself to you as a model, is only offering you the fruit of your efforts in doing so. If that interior voice that judges me in secret and ceaselessly makes itself heard in my heart, makes itself heard in the same way in yours, learn to listen to it and follow it, learn to draw your foremost goods from yourself;  they are the only ones that do not depend on fortune at all [and] can take the place of the others. That is my entire philosophy and, I believe, the entire art of being happy that is feasible to man.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Christopher Kelly, Rousseau on Philosophy, Morality, and Religion. (2007).  Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England. p. 91

One speaks about the cry of remorse that punishes hidden crimes in secret, and so often makes them public. Alas! Who among us has never known that intrusive voice?  One speaks from experience and one would like to erase this involuntary feeling that gives us so many torments. But let us obey nature, we shall know with what sweetness it approves what it has commanded and what charm one finds in tasting the internal peace of a soul satisfied with itself.  The wicked man fears and flees himself, he cheers himself up by throwing himself outside of himself, he directs his anxious eyes around him and seeks an object that makes him laugh, without insulting ridicule he would always be sad:  on the contrary, the serenity of the just man is internal; his laughter is not from malignity but from joy, he bears its source inside himself.  He is as cheerful by himself as he is in the midst of a social circle; and he does not draw that unfailing contentment that one sees reigning in him from those who draw near him, he imparts it to them.  

Ibid., p. 92-93

Conscience, conscience, divine instinct, immortal and celestial voice; assured guide of a being that is ignorant and limited but intelligent and free, in judge of good and evil, sublime emanation of the eternal substance, which makes man similar to the Gods;  it is you alone that makes up the excellence of my nature.

Without you I feel nothing in myself that raises me above the beasts, except for the sad privilege of leading myself astray from errors to errors with the aid of an understanding without rule and a reason without principle.

Ibid., p. 95-96

About Inspirathon

What do the legendary game-changers have to say about following the heart.  Rousseau sums them all up quite nicely by saying: “Whatever God wishes a man to do he does not cause it to be told to him by another man, but he says it to him himself, he writes it in the depths of his heart”.

Inspirathon is dedicated to those courageous folks who have followed their hearts, through thick and thin, and by doing so, have made the world a better place. I hope it inspires you to do the same.

“Every person above the ordinary has a certain mission that they are called to fulfill.” - Goethe
“Don’t part with your illusions. When they are gone you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.” ― Mark Twain
“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” ― Anne Frank