Leonardo Da Vinci, (Italy), is the supreme example of a Renaissance man. His most famous works are the Mona Lisa, and The Last Supper.  He is widely acknowledged as one of the most talented geniuses of all time.  He was a master painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, mathematician, inventor, anatomist, botanist, geologist, and cartographer.  He recorded 13,000 pages of journals and notes on a wide variety of science and engineering topics.
"In the silence of the night, recall the ideas of the things which you have studied. Design in your spirit the contours and outlines of the figures that you have seen during the day. Where the spirit does not work with the hands, there is no artist.”
Moses Foster Sweetser, (1880).  Raphael. Leonardo da Vinci. Michael Angelo.  Boston: Houghton, Osgood and Company
pp. 126 - 127
 I obey Thee, Lord, in the first place through the love it is but reasonable I should feel for Thee; in the second, because Thou canst lengthen or shorten human life at Thy pleasure.
Eugène Müntz, (1883). Leonardo Da Vinci: Artist, Thinker and Man of Science, Volume 2.  London: William Heinemann
pp. 33 – 34
 Leonardo defines spirit as “a power mingled with the body”.
Ibid. p. 43
 Our body is dependent on heaven, and heaven on the Spirit.
Leonardo Da Vinci, Jean Paul Richter, (1883). The Literary Works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Vol II. London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington p. 286
 And you, 0 Man, who will discern in this work of mine the wonderful works of Nature, if you think it would be a criminal thing to destroy it, reflect how much more criminal it is to take the life of a man; and if this, his external form, appears to thee marvelously constructed, remember that it is nothing as compared with the soul that dwells in that structure; for that indeed, be it what it may, is a thing divine. Leave it then to dwell in His work at His good will and pleasure, and let not your rage or malice destroy a life—for indeed, he who does not value it, does not himself deserve it.
Ibid. p. 286
 If the Lord— who is the light of all things— vouchsafe to enlighten me, I will treat of Light; wherefore I will divide the present work into 3 Parts.
Leonardo Da Vinci, Jean Paul Richter (1883). The Literary Works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 1. London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington. p 16.
 Man is the handiwork of a God who retains few links with traditional orthodoxy.

Marco Rosci, (1978). The Hidden Leonardo, Chicago: Rand McNally. p. 166

Leonardo Da Vinci, (Italy), is the supreme example of a Renaissance man. His most famous works are the Mona Lisa, and The Last Supper.  He is widely acknowledged as one of the most talented geniuses of all time.  He was a master painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, mathematician, inventor, anatomist, botanist, geologist, and cartographer.  He recorded 13,000 pages of journals and notes on a wide variety of science and engineering topics.

"In the silence of the night, recall the ideas of the things which you have studied. Design in your spirit the contours and outlines of the figures that you have seen during the day. Where the spirit does not work with the hands, there is no artist.”

Moses Foster Sweetser, (1880).  Raphael. Leonardo da Vinci. Michael Angelo.  Boston: Houghton, Osgood and Company

pp. 126 - 127

 I obey Thee, Lord, in the first place through the love it is but reasonable I should feel for Thee; in the second, because Thou canst lengthen or shorten human life at Thy pleasure.

Eugène Müntz, (1883). Leonardo Da Vinci: Artist, Thinker and Man of Science, Volume 2.  London: William Heinemann

pp. 33 – 34

 Leonardo defines spirit as “a power mingled with the body”.

Ibid. p. 43

 Our body is dependent on heaven, and heaven on the Spirit.

Leonardo Da Vinci, Jean Paul Richter, (1883). The Literary Works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Vol II. London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington p. 286

 And you, 0 Man, who will discern in this work of mine the wonderful works of Nature, if you think it would be a criminal thing to destroy it, reflect how much more criminal it is to take the life of a man; and if this, his external form, appears to thee marvelously constructed, remember that it is nothing as compared with the soul that dwells in that structure; for that indeed, be it what it may, is a thing divine. Leave it then to dwell in His work at His good will and pleasure, and let not your rage or malice destroy a life—for indeed, he who does not value it, does not himself deserve it.

Ibid. p. 286

 If the Lord— who is the light of all things— vouchsafe to enlighten me, I will treat of Light; wherefore I will divide the present work into 3 Parts.

Leonardo Da Vinci, Jean Paul Richter (1883). The Literary Works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Volume 1. London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington. p 16.

 Man is the handiwork of a God who retains few links with traditional orthodoxy.

Marco Rosci, (1978). The Hidden Leonardo, Chicago: Rand McNally. p. 166

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, (Germany), is one of the top three composers in the world, (along with Bach, and Beethoven).  He was the first composer to open up the world of entrepreneurism in his field. He courageously brought social politics to the imperial stage with the controversial and “seditious” Opera The Marriage of Figaro, and the reform minded Magic Flute. Mozart pioneered changes in tempo, volume, and octave to instill emotion and passion into his music.
…we must place our trust in the Lord, and console ourselves by the thought that all must go well if it be in accordance with the will of the Almighty, as he knows best what is most profitable and beneficial both for our temporal and spiritual welfare.
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Lady Wallace, (1866). The Letters of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1769 – 1791) Volume 1. New York: Herd and Houghton. p. 212
I am entirely submissive to the will of God.
Ibid. p. 138
I am a composer, and born to become a Kapellmeister, and I neither can nor ought thus to bury the talent for composition with which God has so richly endowed me (I may say this without arrogance, for I feel it now more than ever)…
Ibid. p. 165
I lately went with my scholar, the Dutch officer, M. de la Pottrie, into the Reformed church, where I played for an hour and a half on the organ. It came right from my heart too.

Ibid. p. 151

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, (Germany), is one of the top three composers in the world, (along with Bach, and Beethoven).  He was the first composer to open up the world of entrepreneurism in his field. He courageously brought social politics to the imperial stage with the controversial and “seditious” Opera The Marriage of Figaro, and the reform minded Magic Flute. Mozart pioneered changes in tempo, volume, and octave to instill emotion and passion into his music.

…we must place our trust in the Lord, and console ourselves by the thought that all must go well if it be in accordance with the will of the Almighty, as he knows best what is most profitable and beneficial both for our temporal and spiritual welfare.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Lady Wallace, (1866). The Letters of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1769 – 1791) Volume 1. New York: Herd and Houghton. p. 212

I am entirely submissive to the will of God.

Ibid. p. 138

I am a composer, and born to become a Kapellmeister, and I neither can nor ought thus to bury the talent for composition with which God has so richly endowed me (I may say this without arrogance, for I feel it now more than ever)…

Ibid. p. 165

I lately went with my scholar, the Dutch officer, M. de la Pottrie, into the Reformed church, where I played for an hour and a half on the organ. It came right from my heart too.

Ibid. p. 151

Franz Liszt, (Hungary), was the first Rock Star, complete with hysterical women tearing at his clothes, and throwing their clothes at piano recitals all across Europe.  Before this time, musical performances were restricted to the upper classes.  Liszt helped break down national barriers, and promote the cause of equality among all people through his concert tours.  He donated generously to charity, and to other artists such as Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Chopin, Schumann, Wagner, Hiller, and Heine.
 The religious direction of the Saint-Simonians, as also their opinion of art and artists, thus brought Franz’s feelings into play, and supplied the foundation of his own views of art: that the latter is no human production, but an emanation from the Deity Itself, to which it leads back in due course, became for Liszt a fundamental maxim.
Although his newly born conception of art did not become thoroughly clear and intelligible until two years later, (from his intimate intercourse with the Abbe de Lamennais), the eccentricities of the Saint Simonians at least imparted shape to his thoughts on the subject. The idea of the artist acting as a medium between God and the world now assumed tangible shape in his mind as being the outcome of an everlasting law.  
Raphaël Ledos de Beaufort, (1887)  Franz Liszt: The Story of His Life, Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co.  p. 113-114
From the following fragment of an essay, written by Liszt in 1834 for the Gazette Musicale de Paris, it will be seen what were then the longings and aspirations of the young man’s ardent soul:
“Music must, as of yore, recognize God and the people as its living fountain-head, it must flow from the former to the latter and vice versa, so as to ennoble comfort and purify man and bless and praise God.”
“This can only be attained through the creation of a new music which for want of a better appellation, we would term humanitarian; that new style of music must be inspired, strong and effective; it must partake, in the largest possible proportions, of the characteristics of both the theatre and the church; in fine, it must be at the same time dramatic and holy, splendid and simple, solemn and serious, fiery, stormy, and calm.” 
Raphaël Ledos de Beaufort, (1887)  Franz Liszt: The Story of His Life, Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co.  p. 129-131

Franz Liszt, (Hungary), was the first Rock Star, complete with hysterical women tearing at his clothes, and throwing their clothes at piano recitals all across Europe.  Before this time, musical performances were restricted to the upper classes.  Liszt helped break down national barriers, and promote the cause of equality among all people through his concert tours.  He donated generously to charity, and to other artists such as Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Chopin, Schumann, Wagner, Hiller, and Heine.

 The religious direction of the Saint-Simonians, as also their opinion of art and artists, thus brought Franz’s feelings into play, and supplied the foundation of his own views of art: that the latter is no human production, but an emanation from the Deity Itself, to which it leads back in due course, became for Liszt a fundamental maxim.

Although his newly born conception of art did not become thoroughly clear and intelligible until two years later, (from his intimate intercourse with the Abbe de Lamennais), the eccentricities of the Saint Simonians at least imparted shape to his thoughts on the subject. The idea of the artist acting as a medium between God and the world now assumed tangible shape in his mind as being the outcome of an everlasting law.  

Raphaël Ledos de Beaufort, (1887)  Franz Liszt: The Story of His Life, Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co.  p. 113-114

From the following fragment of an essay, written by Liszt in 1834 for the Gazette Musicale de Paris, it will be seen what were then the longings and aspirations of the young man’s ardent soul:

“Music must, as of yore, recognize God and the people as its living fountain-head, it must flow from the former to the latter and vice versa, so as to ennoble comfort and purify man and bless and praise God.”

“This can only be attained through the creation of a new music which for want of a better appellation, we would term humanitarian; that new style of music must be inspired, strong and effective; it must partake, in the largest possible proportions, of the characteristics of both the theatre and the church; in fine, it must be at the same time dramatic and holy, splendid and simple, solemn and serious, fiery, stormy, and calm.” 

Raphaël Ledos de Beaufort, (1887)  Franz Liszt: The Story of His Life, Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co.  p. 129-131

Henry David Thoreau, (U.S.), is best known for Walden, a book on his journey of spiritual discovery, living the simple life in the woods near Walden pond for a little more than two years.  He was a passionate spokesman for the anti-slavery movement, and his essay: Civil Disobedience influenced Tolstoy, Ghandi, and Martin Luther King, Jr.
 Chastity is the flowering of man; and what are called Genius, Heroism, Holiness, and the like, are but various fruits which succeed it. Man flows at once to God when the channel of purity is open. By turns our purity inspires and our impurity casts us down. He is blessed who is assured that the animal is dying out in him day by day, and the divine being established. 

Henry David Thoreau, (1910). Walden.  New York: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co. p. 291

Henry David Thoreau, (U.S.), is best known for Walden, a book on his journey of spiritual discovery, living the simple life in the woods near Walden pond for a little more than two years.  He was a passionate spokesman for the anti-slavery movement, and his essay: Civil Disobedience influenced Tolstoy, Ghandi, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

 Chastity is the flowering of man; and what are called Genius, Heroism, Holiness, and the like, are but various fruits which succeed it. Man flows at once to God when the channel of purity is open. By turns our purity inspires and our impurity casts us down. He is blessed who is assured that the animal is dying out in him day by day, and the divine being established. 

Henry David Thoreau, (1910). Walden.  New York: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co. p. 291

Eugène Delacroix, (France), was perhaps the greatest artist of the Romantic Movement.  His most famous work, Liberty Leading the People, was influential in moving public opinion toward the ideals of freedom during a time when monarchies were being replaced by elected government.  Delacroix pushed the envelope by showing vividly the horrors and destruction of war.
I just saw Orion shining for a moment amid black clouds and a raging wind. I thought first of my vanity, in comparison with those suspended worlds. Then I thought of justice, of friendship, of the divine sentiments engraved on the heart of man, and I no longer found anything great in the world save man and his Creator. This idea impresses me. Can it be that He does not exist? Can chance, by combining certain elements, have created the virtues— reflections of an unknown grandeur? If chance had made the universe, what would conscience, remorse, and devotion signify? Oh, if you can believe, with all the strength of your being, in that God who invented duty, your indecision will be settled. For admit that it is always this life— fear for it or for your comfort— that troubles the fleeting days, which would pass peacefully, if, at the end of the journey, you saw the bosom of your Heavenly Father waiting to welcome you. I must leave this to go to bed— but I have dreamed most pleasantly. I see some progress in my study of horses.
Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863), Journal, Paris, evening, October 12, 1822
Eugène Delacroix, Walter Pach (translator), 1961. The Journal of Eugène Delacroix.  New York, Grove Press. p. 42-43
 God is within us; it is that inner presence which makes us admire the beautiful, which rejoices us when we have done right and consoles us for not sharing the happiness of the wicked. It is that, beyond a doubt, which constitutes the inspiration of men of genius and which warms them at the spectacle of their own productions. There are men of virtue as there are men of genius; the one group and the other are inspired and favored by God. And so also the reverse would be true: there would thus be natures in whom the divine inspiration has no effect, who coldly commit crime, who never rejoice at the sight of the honest and of the beautiful. And so there are men favored by the eternal Being. Misfortune, which frequently, too frequently, seems to attach itself to these great hearts, does not, happily, cause them to succumb during their short passage: the sight of the wicked laden with the gifts of fortune should in no wise overcome them; what do I say? often they are consoled on seeing the trouble and the terrors which besiege evil beings and make bitter their prosperity. Their punishment, during the present life, is often to be witnessed. For the other group, the inner satisfaction of obeying divine inspiration is a sufficient recompense: the despair of the wicked, struck down in their unjust enjoyments, is….
 Eugène Delacroix, Journal, Augerville, October 12, 1862

Eugène Delacroix, Walter Pach (translator), 1961. The Journal of Eugène Delacroix.  New York, Grove Press. p. 69

Eugène Delacroix, (France), was perhaps the greatest artist of the Romantic Movement.  His most famous work, Liberty Leading the People, was influential in moving public opinion toward the ideals of freedom during a time when monarchies were being replaced by elected government.  Delacroix pushed the envelope by showing vividly the horrors and destruction of war.

I just saw Orion shining for a moment amid black clouds and a raging wind. I thought first of my vanity, in comparison with those suspended worlds. Then I thought of justice, of friendship, of the divine sentiments engraved on the heart of man, and I no longer found anything great in the world save man and his Creator. This idea impresses me. Can it be that He does not exist? Can chance, by combining certain elements, have created the virtues— reflections of an unknown grandeur? If chance had made the universe, what would conscience, remorse, and devotion signify? Oh, if you can believe, with all the strength of your being, in that God who invented duty, your indecision will be settled. For admit that it is always this life— fear for it or for your comfort— that troubles the fleeting days, which would pass peacefully, if, at the end of the journey, you saw the bosom of your Heavenly Father waiting to welcome you. I must leave this to go to bed— but I have dreamed most pleasantly. I see some progress in my study of horses.

Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863), Journal, Paris, evening, October 12, 1822

Eugène Delacroix, Walter Pach (translator), 1961. The Journal of Eugène Delacroix.  New York, Grove Press. p. 42-43

 God is within us; it is that inner presence which makes us admire the beautiful, which rejoices us when we have done right and consoles us for not sharing the happiness of the wicked. It is that, beyond a doubt, which constitutes the inspiration of men of genius and which warms them at the spectacle of their own productions. There are men of virtue as there are men of genius; the one group and the other are inspired and favored by God. And so also the reverse would be true: there would thus be natures in whom the divine inspiration has no effect, who coldly commit crime, who never rejoice at the sight of the honest and of the beautiful. And so there are men favored by the eternal Being. Misfortune, which frequently, too frequently, seems to attach itself to these great hearts, does not, happily, cause them to succumb during their short passage: the sight of the wicked laden with the gifts of fortune should in no wise overcome them; what do I say? often they are consoled on seeing the trouble and the terrors which besiege evil beings and make bitter their prosperity. Their punishment, during the present life, is often to be witnessed. For the other group, the inner satisfaction of obeying divine inspiration is a sufficient recompense: the despair of the wicked, struck down in their unjust enjoyments, is….

 Eugène Delacroix, Journal, Augerville, October 12, 1862

Eugène Delacroix, Walter Pach (translator), 1961. The Journal of Eugène Delacroix.  New York, Grove Press. p. 69

Immanuel Kant, (German), is widely credited as the key player in the development of modern philosophy, and Western thought. Kant redefined the fundamentals of philosophical inquiry.  Kant argued that “pure reason” could not prove God’s existence, but “practical reason” could.  Kant claimed that by observing the moral instincts of people we can see that there is some kind of source beyond the mere human will itself that directs life.
 We have no other rule of our actions but the conduct of that divine man within us, with which we compare ourselves, and by which we judge and better ourselves, though we can never reach it.
Immanuel Kant (F. Max Mueller) (1922). Immanuel Kant’s Critique of pure reason, London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. p. 460 - 461

Such an ideal person, authorized to sit as JUDGE in the court of conscience, must be A SEARCHER OF THE HEART, for the tribunal is erected in the interior of man.  Further, he must hold ALL-OBLIGATORY POWER, i.e., be such a person, or at least be figured as if he were a person, in respect of whom all duty may be represented as his commandments, because conscience is judge over all free actions.  Lastly, he must have all power (in heaven and in earth) to absolve and to condemn, these properties being of the very essence of the functions of a judge: apart from his being endowed wherewith, he could give no effect to the law. But since he who searches the heart, and, having all-obligatory power, is able to absolve and condemn, is called GOD, it follows that conscience must be regarded as a subjective principle implanted in the reason of man,  calling for an account of every action before God.  Nay, THIS NOTION OF RESPONSIBILITY IS at all times involved, however darkly, IN EVERY ACT OF MORAL SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS.
This is not by any means to say that man is entitled, and still less that he is bound, to believe in, As REAL, any such Supreme Being, answering to the idea, to which conscience inevitably points; for the idea is given him not objectively by speculative reason, but subjectively only, by practical reason obliging itself to act conformably to this representation. And mankind is, by means of this idea, but merely from its ANALOGY to that of a sovereign lawgiver of the universe, led to figure to himself CONSCIENTIOUSNESS, as a responsibility owed to A MOST HOLY BEING, different from ourselves, and yet most intimately present to our substance (moral legislative reason), and to submit ourselves to His will as if it were a law of righteousness.  THE NOTION OF RELIGION in genere is therefore just this, that it IS A PRINCIPLE OF ESTEEMING OF ALL OUR DUTIES AS IF THEY WERE DIVINE COMMANDMENTS.
Immanuel Kant (J. W. Semple) (1871). The metaphysic of ethics, Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark  pp. 255-256
 God’s existence - Besides, the cardinal truth, ‘there is a God,’ is so obvious to the eye of sane reason, and the practical belief in Him so naturally crowns all morality, as not to leave a cultivated and virtuous mind a moment in doubt of this indispensable basis, this first principle, of all true religion.

Immanuel Kant, (John Richardson) (1836). Metaphysical works of the celebrated Immanuel Kant London: Printed for W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, Stationers’ Court. p. 158

Immanuel Kant, (German), is widely credited as the key player in the development of modern philosophy, and Western thought. Kant redefined the fundamentals of philosophical inquiry.  Kant argued that “pure reason” could not prove God’s existence, but “practical reason” could.  Kant claimed that by observing the moral instincts of people we can see that there is some kind of source beyond the mere human will itself that directs life.

 We have no other rule of our actions but the conduct of that divine man within us, with which we compare ourselves, and by which we judge and better ourselves, though we can never reach it.

Immanuel Kant (F. Max Mueller) (1922). Immanuel Kant’s Critique of pure reason, London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd. p. 460 - 461

Such an ideal person, authorized to sit as JUDGE in the court of conscience, must be A SEARCHER OF THE HEART, for the tribunal is erected in the interior of man.  Further, he must hold ALL-OBLIGATORY POWER, i.e., be such a person, or at least be figured as if he were a person, in respect of whom all duty may be represented as his commandments, because conscience is judge over all free actions.  Lastly, he must have all power (in heaven and in earth) to absolve and to condemn, these properties being of the very essence of the functions of a judge: apart from his being endowed wherewith, he could give no effect to the law. But since he who searches the heart, and, having all-obligatory power, is able to absolve and condemn, is called GOD, it follows that conscience must be regarded as a subjective principle implanted in the reason of man,  calling for an account of every action before God.  Nay, THIS NOTION OF RESPONSIBILITY IS at all times involved, however darkly, IN EVERY ACT OF MORAL SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS.

This is not by any means to say that man is entitled, and still less that he is bound, to believe in, As REAL, any such Supreme Being, answering to the idea, to which conscience inevitably points; for the idea is given him not objectively by speculative reason, but subjectively only, by practical reason obliging itself to act conformably to this representation. And mankind is, by means of this idea, but merely from its ANALOGY to that of a sovereign lawgiver of the universe, led to figure to himself CONSCIENTIOUSNESS, as a responsibility owed to A MOST HOLY BEING, different from ourselves, and yet most intimately present to our substance (moral legislative reason), and to submit ourselves to His will as if it were a law of righteousness.  THE NOTION OF RELIGION in genere is therefore just this, that it IS A PRINCIPLE OF ESTEEMING OF ALL OUR DUTIES AS IF THEY WERE DIVINE COMMANDMENTS.

Immanuel Kant (J. W. Semple) (1871). The metaphysic of ethics, Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark  pp. 255-256

 God’s existence - Besides, the cardinal truth, ‘there is a God,’ is so obvious to the eye of sane reason, and the practical belief in Him so naturally crowns all morality, as not to leave a cultivated and virtuous mind a moment in doubt of this indispensable basis, this first principle, of all true religion.

Immanuel Kant, (John Richardson) (1836). Metaphysical works of the celebrated Immanuel Kant London: Printed for W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, Stationers’ Court. p. 158

Confucius, (China), teachings greatly influenced Chinese culture with respect to the ideal man.  Confucius’ influence on Chinese culture is similar to that of Socrates in the West, according to Fung Yu-lan, one of the great scholars on the history of China.  A disciple once asked him: “Is there any one word that could guide a person throughout life?”  Confucius replied: “Never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself.”
 The following are some of the religious utterances of Confucius about Heaven: “Only Heaven is great (Anal. VIII. 19) . “The superior man stands in awe of the ordinances (or the will) of Heaven” (Anal. XVI, 8) . “Without recognizing the ordinances of Heaven, it is impossible to be a superior man”, (Anal. XX, 3) . “In order to know men the superior man must know Heaven” (Chung-yung XX, 7) . ” When I was fifty, I understood the decree (or mandate) of Heaven” (Anal. II, 4.4)  “It is wrong to attempt to deceive Heaven (Anal. IX, 11) .  “He who offends against Heaven has none to whom he can pray” (Anal. III, 13) . Confucius would like not to speak (but simply to let his influence shine), as Heaven does not speak and yet produces all things (Anal. XVII, 19.3) . He calls upon Heaven as a witness of his innocence, (VI. 26) . Against the sad experience, that nobody “knows,” i.e., rightly understands, him, he comforts himself with the assurance: ”But Heaven Knows me” (XIV. 37) .

Pastor P. Kranz, (1903). The East of Asia magazine, Volume 2, p. 33

Confucius, (China), teachings greatly influenced Chinese culture with respect to the ideal man.  Confucius’ influence on Chinese culture is similar to that of Socrates in the West, according to Fung Yu-lan, one of the great scholars on the history of China.  A disciple once asked him: “Is there any one word that could guide a person throughout life?”  Confucius replied: “Never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself.”

 The following are some of the religious utterances of Confucius about Heaven: “Only Heaven is great (Anal. VIII. 19) . “The superior man stands in awe of the ordinances (or the will) of Heaven” (Anal. XVI, 8) . “Without recognizing the ordinances of Heaven, it is impossible to be a superior man”, (Anal. XX, 3) . “In order to know men the superior man must know Heaven” (Chung-yung XX, 7) . ” When I was fifty, I understood the decree (or mandate) of Heaven” (Anal. II, 4.4)  “It is wrong to attempt to deceive Heaven (Anal. IX, 11) .  “He who offends against Heaven has none to whom he can pray” (Anal. III, 13) . Confucius would like not to speak (but simply to let his influence shine), as Heaven does not speak and yet produces all things (Anal. XVII, 19.3) . He calls upon Heaven as a witness of his innocence, (VI. 26) . Against the sad experience, that nobody “knows,” i.e., rightly understands, him, he comforts himself with the assurance: ”But Heaven Knows me” (XIV. 37) .

Pastor P. Kranz, (1903). The East of Asia magazine, Volume 2, p. 33

Johannes Brahms’ Lullaby has been sung by countless parents in putting their children to bed over the years.  The Hungarian Dance # 5 is perhaps the most popular piece of folk music ever written, and Brahm’s Symphony # 1 was the most widely performed piece of classical music of 2010 – 2011, (according to the League of American Orchestras).  Brahms is often referred to as one of the three great B’s of German composers - Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms.
 It cannot be done merely by will power working through the conscious mind…. It can only be accomplished by the soul powers within.  To realize that we are one with the Creator, as Beethoven did, is a wonderful and awe-inspiring experience.…I immediately feel vibrations that thrill my whole being…Those vibrations assume the forms of distinct mental images…the ideas flow in upon me, directly from God…measure by measure the finished product is revealed to me …I have to be in a semi-trance condition to get such results… the conscious mind is in temporary abeyance and the subconscious is in control, for it is through the subconscious mind…that the inspiration comes. I have to be careful, however, not to lose consciousness, otherwise the ideas fade away.  
Arthur M. Abell, (1987). Talks with Great Composers. New York: Philosophical Library, 1987, pp. 4-6.

Johannes Brahms’ Lullaby has been sung by countless parents in putting their children to bed over the years.  The Hungarian Dance # 5 is perhaps the most popular piece of folk music ever written, and Brahm’s Symphony # 1 was the most widely performed piece of classical music of 2010 – 2011, (according to the League of American Orchestras).  Brahms is often referred to as one of the three great B’s of German composers - Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms.

 It cannot be done merely by will power working through the conscious mind…. It can only be accomplished by the soul powers within.  To realize that we are one with the Creator, as Beethoven did, is a wonderful and awe-inspiring experience.…I immediately feel vibrations that thrill my whole being…Those vibrations assume the forms of distinct mental images…the ideas flow in upon me, directly from God…measure by measure the finished product is revealed to me …I have to be in a semi-trance condition to get such results… the conscious mind is in temporary abeyance and the subconscious is in control, for it is through the subconscious mind…that the inspiration comes. I have to be careful, however, not to lose consciousness, otherwise the ideas fade away.  

Arthur M. Abell, (1987). Talks with Great Composers. New York: Philosophical Library, 1987, pp. 4-6.

George Washington Carver, (U.S.), rose from slavery to make major contributions to agricultural with his crop rotation system to enrich soil which had become depleted of nutrients from cotton farming by planting crops such as peanuts, sweet potatoes, and soybeans.  Then, because these replacement crops had smaller markets, he discovered numerous uses for the rotated crops. He became quite famous and used his influence to reduce racial tensions.
 I never have to grope for methods. The method is revealed at the moment I am inspired to create something new. Without God to draw aside the curtain I would be helpless.
Federer, W. J. 1994. America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations. Coppell, TX: FAME Publishing, 96.
 ”Never since have I been without this consciousness of the Creator speaking to me….The out of doors has been to me more and more a great cathedral in which God could be continuously spoken to and heard from.”

Ibid., p. 97

George Washington Carver, (U.S.), rose from slavery to make major contributions to agricultural with his crop rotation system to enrich soil which had become depleted of nutrients from cotton farming by planting crops such as peanuts, sweet potatoes, and soybeans.  Then, because these replacement crops had smaller markets, he discovered numerous uses for the rotated crops. He became quite famous and used his influence to reduce racial tensions.

 I never have to grope for methods. The method is revealed at the moment I am inspired to create something new. Without God to draw aside the curtain I would be helpless.

Federer, W. J. 1994. America’s God and Country Encyclopedia of Quotations. Coppell, TX: FAME Publishing, 96.

 ”Never since have I been without this consciousness of the Creator speaking to me….The out of doors has been to me more and more a great cathedral in which God could be continuously spoken to and heard from.”

Ibid., p. 97

Percy Bysshe Shelley, (England), is a prominent Romantic poet, regarded by critics as among the finest lyric poets ever.  Shelley gave poetic expression to the longings of the oppressed classes, which in his day included just about everyone but the aristocracy.  Shelley’s poem, Masque of Anarchy, has been a powerful inspiration on the principle of nonviolent resistance, and his reform minded poetry has inspired other reformers such as Thoreau, Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King.
 Whosoever is free from the contamination of luxury and license may go forth to the fields and to the woods, inhaling joyous renovation from the breath of Spring, and catching from the odors and sounds of autumn some diviner mood of sweetest sadness, which improves the softened heart. Whosoever is no deceiver and destroyer of his fellow-men - no liar, no flatterer, no murderer - may walk among his species, deriving, from the communion with all which they contain of beautiful or majestic, some intercourse with the Universal God. Whosoever has maintained with his own heart the strictest correspondence of confidence, who dares to examine and to estimate every imagination which suggests itself to his mind - whosoever is that which he designs to become, and only aspires to that which the divinity of his own nature shall consider and approve - he has already seen God.
Charles Sotheran, (1876). PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY AS A PHILOSOPHER AND REFORMER.  New York: Charles P. Somerby, p. 8
 Our most imperial and stupendous qualities — those on which the majesty and the power of humanity is erected — are, relatively to the inferior portion of its mechanism, active and imperial; but they are the passive slaves of some higher and more omnipotent Power. This Power is God; and those who have seen God have, in the period of their purer and more perfect nature, been harmonized by their own will to so exquisite agreement of power as to give forth divinest melody, when the breath of universal being sweeps over their frame.  That those who are pure in heart shall see God, and that virtue is its own reward, may be considered as equivalent assertions.  p. 87

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ernest Rhys, (1887).  Shelley’s Essays and Letters.  London: Walter Scott.  

Percy Bysshe Shelley, (England), is a prominent Romantic poet, regarded by critics as among the finest lyric poets ever.  Shelley gave poetic expression to the longings of the oppressed classes, which in his day included just about everyone but the aristocracy.  Shelley’s poem, Masque of Anarchy, has been a powerful inspiration on the principle of nonviolent resistance, and his reform minded poetry has inspired other reformers such as Thoreau, Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King.

 Whosoever is free from the contamination of luxury and license may go forth to the fields and to the woods, inhaling joyous renovation from the breath of Spring, and catching from the odors and sounds of autumn some diviner mood of sweetest sadness, which improves the softened heart. Whosoever is no deceiver and destroyer of his fellow-men - no liar, no flatterer, no murderer - may walk among his species, deriving, from the communion with all which they contain of beautiful or majestic, some intercourse with the Universal God. Whosoever has maintained with his own heart the strictest correspondence of confidence, who dares to examine and to estimate every imagination which suggests itself to his mind - whosoever is that which he designs to become, and only aspires to that which the divinity of his own nature shall consider and approve - he has already seen God.

Charles Sotheran, (1876). PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY AS A PHILOSOPHER AND REFORMER.  New York: Charles P. Somerby, p. 8

 Our most imperial and stupendous qualities — those on which the majesty and the power of humanity is erected — are, relatively to the inferior portion of its mechanism, active and imperial; but they are the passive slaves of some higher and more omnipotent Power. This Power is God; and those who have seen God have, in the period of their purer and more perfect nature, been harmonized by their own will to so exquisite agreement of power as to give forth divinest melody, when the breath of universal being sweeps over their frame.  That those who are pure in heart shall see God, and that virtue is its own reward, may be considered as equivalent assertions.  p. 87

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ernest Rhys, (1887).  Shelley’s Essays and Letters.  London: Walter Scott.