James Clerk Maxwell is most famous for “Maxwell’s equations”, which define how magnetism, electricity, and light behave.  This laid the groundwork for modern physics, in such fields as special relativity and quantum mechanics.  Einstein described Maxwell’s work as the “most profound and the most fruitful that physics has experienced since the time of Newton.”

James Clerk Maxwell is most famous for “Maxwell’s equations”, which define how magnetism, electricity, and light behave.  This laid the groundwork for modern physics, in such fields as special relativity and quantum mechanics.  Einstein described Maxwell’s work as the “most profound and the most fruitful that physics has experienced since the time of Newton.”

Alfred Lord Tennyson, (UK), was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of the Victorian era and continues to be a very popular British poet.  His works on Camelot, King Arthur, and the Knights of the round-table drove the idea of chivalry, courage, and honor into a virtual British national identity.  In “Ulysses” he urges his readers to persevere through hard times, never giving up.  This resolve echoed into the twentieth century with Winston Churchill’s famous “Never give up” determination during World War II.

"This is one of my meanings," he said, "of

Ring in the Christ that is to be:

when Christianity without bigotry will triumph, when the controversies of creeds shall have vanished, and Shall bear false witness, each of each, no more,
But find their limits by that larger light,
And overstep them, moving easily
Thro’ after-ages in the Love of Truth,
The truth of Love”
Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.  New York: The Macmillan Co. p. 326

He wrote: “A kind of waking trance I have frequently had, quite up from boyhood, when I have been all alone. This has generally come upon me thro’ repeating my own name two or three times to myself silently, till all at once, as it were out of the intensity of the consciousness of individuality, the individuality itself seemed to dissolve and fade away into boundless being, and this not a confused state, but the clearest of the clearest, the surest of the surest, the weirdest of the weirdest, utterly beyond words, where death was an almost laughable impossibility, the loss of personality (if so it were) seeming no extinction but the only true life.” “This might,” he said, “be the state which St. Paul describes, ‘Whether in the body I cannot tell, or whether out of the body I cannot tell.’” He continued: “I am ashamed of my feeble description, Have I not said the state is utterly beyond words? But in a moment, when I come back to my normal state of ‘sanity,’ I am ready to fight for my life, and hold that it will last for eons of eons.”Ibid., p. 320

About prayer he said “The reason why men find it hard to regard prayer in the same light in which it was formerly regarded is, that we seem to know more of the unchangeableness of Law, but I believe that God reveals Himself in each individual soul. Prayer is, to take a mundane simile, like opening a sluice between the great ocean and our little channels when the great sea gathers itself together and flows in at full tide.” “Prayer on our part is the highest aspiration of the soul.”
Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.Ibid., p. 324

Speak to Him thou for He hears, and Spirit with Spirit can meet—Closer is He than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet.ibid., p. 325

Alfred Lord Tennyson, (UK), was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of the Victorian era and continues to be a very popular British poet.  His works on Camelot, King Arthur, and the Knights of the round-table drove the idea of chivalry, courage, and honor into a virtual British national identity.  In “Ulysses” he urges his readers to persevere through hard times, never giving up.  This resolve echoed into the twentieth century with Winston Churchill’s famous “Never give up” determination during World War II.

"This is one of my meanings," he said, "of

Ring in the Christ that is to be:

when Christianity without bigotry will triumph, when the controversies of creeds shall have vanished, and Shall bear false witness, each of each, no more,

But find their limits by that larger light,

And overstep them, moving easily

Thro’ after-ages in the Love of Truth,

The truth of Love”

Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.  New York: The Macmillan Co. p. 326

He wrote: “A kind of waking trance I have frequently had, quite up from boyhood, when I have been all alone. This has generally come upon me thro’ repeating my own name two or three times to myself silently, till all at once, as it were out of the intensity of the consciousness of individuality, the individuality itself seemed to dissolve and fade away into boundless being, and this not a confused state, but the clearest of the clearest, the surest of the surest, the weirdest of the weirdest, utterly beyond words, where death was an almost laughable impossibility, the loss of personality (if so it were) seeming no extinction but the only true life.” “This might,” he said, “be the state which St. Paul describes, ‘Whether in the body I cannot tell, or whether out of the body I cannot tell.’” He continued: “I am ashamed of my feeble description, Have I not said the state is utterly beyond words? But in a moment, when I come back to my normal state of ‘sanity,’ I am ready to fight for my life, and hold that it will last for eons of eons.”
Ibid., p. 320

About prayer he said “The reason why men find it hard to regard prayer in the same light in which it was formerly regarded is, that we seem to know more of the unchangeableness of Law, but I believe that God reveals Himself in each individual soul. Prayer is, to take a mundane simile, like opening a sluice between the great ocean and our little channels when the great sea gathers itself together and flows in at full tide.” “Prayer on our part is the highest aspiration of the soul.”

Baron Hallam Tennyson Tennyson, (1898),  Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son: Volume 1.
Ibid., p. 324

Speak to Him thou for He hears, and Spirit with Spirit can meet—Closer is He than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet.
ibid., p. 325

Durante Alighieri, (Italy), was a major poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy is widely considered to be one of the greatest works of world literature.  At first glance, the poem describes Dante’s travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, but on a deeper level, it describes the soul’s journey towards Heaven.

Durante Alighieri, (Italy), was a major poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy is widely considered to be one of the greatest works of world literature.  At first glance, the poem describes Dante’s travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, but on a deeper level, it describes the soul’s journey towards Heaven.

Pablo Picasso was one of the most influential artist of the twentieth century. He pioneered Cubism, co-invented collage and made major contributions to Surrealism and Symbolism.  He also used his art to promote peace and nonviolence, as in the mural “Guernica” he painted in 1937.

When I work, I leave my body outside the door, the way the Moslems take off their shoes before they enter a mosque.

Andy Zubko, (2003). Treasury Of Spiritual Wisdom A Collection Of 10,000 Powerful Quotations For Transforming Your Life. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishing. p. 498

Pablo Picasso was one of the most influential artist of the twentieth century. He pioneered Cubism, co-invented collage and made major contributions to Surrealism and Symbolism.  He also used his art to promote peace and nonviolence, as in the mural “Guernica” he painted in 1937.

When I work, I leave my body outside the door, the way the Moslems take off their shoes before they enter a mosque.

Andy Zubko, (2003). Treasury Of Spiritual Wisdom A Collection Of 10,000 Powerful Quotations For Transforming Your Life. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishing. p. 498

Bach influenced both Beethoven and Mozart. “Study Bach, there you will find everything.” – Brahms. “In Bach the vital cells of music are united as the world is in God.” – Mahler. “Playing and studying Bach convinces us that we are all numbskulls.” – Schumann.

Bach’s commentary on 1 Chron 28:21
Behold the hierarchy of the priests and Levites for all the services in the house of God, they are with you in all the work and are willing and able for all services as are the princes and the people for all your dealings. (which you will grasp.) It is clear however, from this divine model, and from all prophetic direction of David, that he has accomplished nothing through his own works, in the building and management of the temple, and the worship service, but rather through the model that the Lord has placed before him in his spirit, in every respect and according to the dealings of service in whatever manner God has placed them in his heart.  For one serves God in vain with willful or selfish services.  God prescribes, carves out, calculates and arranges everything for us, and thus explains His will how He wants to be respected by us; therefore, in matters of religion we should presume and do nothing without His revealed word.

Johann Sebastian Bach, Abraham Calov, Howard H. Cox, (1985).  The Calov Bible.  Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press.  p. 418

Bach influenced both Beethoven and Mozart. “Study Bach, there you will find everything.” – Brahms. “In Bach the vital cells of music are united as the world is in God.” – Mahler. “Playing and studying Bach convinces us that we are all numbskulls.” – Schumann.

Bach’s commentary on 1 Chron 28:21

Behold the hierarchy of the priests and Levites for all the services in the house of God, they are with you in all the work and are willing and able for all services as are the princes and the people for all your dealings. (which you will grasp.) It is clear however, from this divine model, and from all prophetic direction of David, that he has accomplished nothing through his own works, in the building and management of the temple, and the worship service, but rather through the model that the Lord has placed before him in his spirit, in every respect and according to the dealings of service in whatever manner God has placed them in his heart.  For one serves God in vain with willful or selfish services.  God prescribes, carves out, calculates and arranges everything for us, and thus explains His will how He wants to be respected by us; therefore, in matters of religion we should presume and do nothing without His revealed word.

Johann Sebastian Bach, Abraham Calov, Howard H. Cox, (1985).  The Calov Bible.  Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press.  p. 418

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (Switzerland / France), was an epic game-changer influencing much of our modern-day culture such as: the rise of democracy and the fall of monarchy, (rule by kings), citizenship, private property, education, and literary romanticism during a time very different from ours.  His Discourse on the Origin of Inequality was the Hunger Games of his day.
Our passions are the principal instruments of our conservation, and it is therefore an attempt as vain as it is ridiculous to wish to destroy them; it would be to control Nature and reform the work of God. If God were to tell man to destroy the passions which he has given him, God would and would not, he would contradict himself. But he has never given this senseless order; nothing like it is written in the human heart; and whatever God wishes a man to do he does not cause it to be told to him by another man, but he says it to him himself, he writes it in the depths of his heart.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Payne. (1909).  Rousseau’s Emile.  New York: D. Appleton & Company.  p. 193

Such is the condition of a soul that daring to propose itself to you as a model, is only offering you the fruit of your efforts in doing so. If that interior voice that judges me in secret and ceaselessly makes itself heard in my heart, makes itself heard in the same way in yours, learn to listen to it and follow it, learn to draw your foremost goods from yourself;  they are the only ones that do not depend on fortune at all [and] can take the place of the others. That is my entire philosophy and, I believe, the entire art of being happy that is feasible to man.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Christopher Kelly, Rousseau on Philosophy, Morality, and Religion. (2007).  Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England. p. 91

One speaks about the cry of remorse that punishes hidden crimes in secret, and so often makes them public. Alas! Who among us has never known that intrusive voice?  One speaks from experience and one would like to erase this involuntary feeling that gives us so many torments. But let us obey nature, we shall know with what sweetness it approves what it has commanded and what charm one finds in tasting the internal peace of a soul satisfied with itself.  The wicked man fears and flees himself, he cheers himself up by throwing himself outside of himself, he directs his anxious eyes around him and seeks an object that makes him laugh, without insulting ridicule he would always be sad:  on the contrary, the serenity of the just man is internal; his laughter is not from malignity but from joy, he bears its source inside himself.  He is as cheerful by himself as he is in the midst of a social circle; and he does not draw that unfailing contentment that one sees reigning in him from those who draw near him, he imparts it to them.  
Ibid., p. 92-93

Conscience, conscience, divine instinct, immortal and celestial voice; assured guide of a being that is ignorant and limited but intelligent and free, in judge of good and evil, sublime emanation of the eternal substance, which makes man similar to the Gods;  it is you alone that makes up the excellence of my nature.
Without you I feel nothing in myself that raises me above the beasts, except for the sad privilege of leading myself astray from errors to errors with the aid of an understanding without rule and a reason without principle.

Ibid., p. 95-96

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (Switzerland / France), was an epic game-changer influencing much of our modern-day culture such as: the rise of democracy and the fall of monarchy, (rule by kings), citizenship, private property, education, and literary romanticism during a time very different from ours.  His Discourse on the Origin of Inequality was the Hunger Games of his day.

Our passions are the principal instruments of our conservation, and it is therefore an attempt as vain as it is ridiculous to wish to destroy them; it would be to control Nature and reform the work of God. If God were to tell man to destroy the passions which he has given him, God would and would not, he would contradict himself. But he has never given this senseless order; nothing like it is written in the human heart; and whatever God wishes a man to do he does not cause it to be told to him by another man, but he says it to him himself, he writes it in the depths of his heart.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Payne. (1909).  Rousseau’s Emile.  New York: D. Appleton & Company.  p. 193

Such is the condition of a soul that daring to propose itself to you as a model, is only offering you the fruit of your efforts in doing so. If that interior voice that judges me in secret and ceaselessly makes itself heard in my heart, makes itself heard in the same way in yours, learn to listen to it and follow it, learn to draw your foremost goods from yourself;  they are the only ones that do not depend on fortune at all [and] can take the place of the others. That is my entire philosophy and, I believe, the entire art of being happy that is feasible to man.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Christopher Kelly, Rousseau on Philosophy, Morality, and Religion. (2007).  Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England. p. 91

One speaks about the cry of remorse that punishes hidden crimes in secret, and so often makes them public. Alas! Who among us has never known that intrusive voice?  One speaks from experience and one would like to erase this involuntary feeling that gives us so many torments. But let us obey nature, we shall know with what sweetness it approves what it has commanded and what charm one finds in tasting the internal peace of a soul satisfied with itself.  The wicked man fears and flees himself, he cheers himself up by throwing himself outside of himself, he directs his anxious eyes around him and seeks an object that makes him laugh, without insulting ridicule he would always be sad:  on the contrary, the serenity of the just man is internal; his laughter is not from malignity but from joy, he bears its source inside himself.  He is as cheerful by himself as he is in the midst of a social circle; and he does not draw that unfailing contentment that one sees reigning in him from those who draw near him, he imparts it to them.  

Ibid., p. 92-93

Conscience, conscience, divine instinct, immortal and celestial voice; assured guide of a being that is ignorant and limited but intelligent and free, in judge of good and evil, sublime emanation of the eternal substance, which makes man similar to the Gods;  it is you alone that makes up the excellence of my nature.

Without you I feel nothing in myself that raises me above the beasts, except for the sad privilege of leading myself astray from errors to errors with the aid of an understanding without rule and a reason without principle.

Ibid., p. 95-96

About Inspirathon

What do the legendary game-changers have to say about following the heart.  Rousseau sums them all up quite nicely by saying: “Whatever God wishes a man to do he does not cause it to be told to him by another man, but he says it to him himself, he writes it in the depths of his heart”.

Inspirathon is dedicated to those courageous folks who have followed their hearts, through thick and thin, and by doing so, have made the world a better place. I hope it inspires you to do the same.

“Every person above the ordinary has a certain mission that they are called to fulfill.” - Goethe
“Don’t part with your illusions. When they are gone you may still exist, but you have ceased to live.” ― Mark Twain
“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” ― Anne Frank

Franz Kafka, (German), was one of the most important writers of the twentieth century. The term Kafkaesque can be found in the Merriam-Webster dictionary defined as:  having a nightmarishly complex, bizarre, or illogical quality, such as can be experienced when dealing with large impersonal bureaucracies.  Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is included on Adler’s Great Books List.
There is nothing besides a spiritual world; what we call the world of the senses is the Evil in the spiritual world, and what we call Evil is only the necessity of a moment in our eternal evolution.
Franz Kafka, (1954).  Wedding Preparations in the Country.  London: Secker and Warburg. P. 43

What will be my fate as a writer is very simple. My talent for portraying my dreamlike inner life has thrust all matters into the background; my life has dwindled dreadfully, nor will it cease to dwindle. Nothing else will ever satisfy me.
Franz Kafka, Stanley Corngold, (1986). The Metamorphisis. New York: Bantam Dell. p. xvii

Evil does not exist; once you have crossed the threshold, all is good. Once in another world, you must hold your tongue.
Franz Kafka, (1965).  The Diaries of Franz Kafka, Volume 2.  New York: Schocken Books. p. 205

The most dominant spiritual impulse in Prague issued from the Theosophical movement, founded by Madame Blavatsky, which in the German-speaking world at the time was headed by Rudolph Steiner. Indeed, Kafka began his session with Steiner by claiming that his whole being was yearning toward “Theosophie.” He concluded the session with a vow: he would continue on the personally tortuous path of Theosophy if Steiner told him to do so. Despite Kafka’s ending his March 28 diary entry by describing Steiner picking his nose (and in this way belittling him), the fact remains that Kafka deferred to Steiner’s discourse about clairvoyant and mystical modes of consciousness, aimed at creating a new faith for modern man through direct experience of the divine.  P. 10

June O. Leavitt, (2011).  The Mystical Life of Franz Kafka: Theosophy, Cabala, and the Modern Spiritual Revival.  New York: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Franz Kafka, (German), was one of the most important writers of the twentieth century. The term Kafkaesque can be found in the Merriam-Webster dictionary defined as:  having a nightmarishly complex, bizarre, or illogical quality, such as can be experienced when dealing with large impersonal bureaucracies.  Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is included on Adler’s Great Books List.

There is nothing besides a spiritual world; what we call the world of the senses is the Evil in the spiritual world, and what we call Evil is only the necessity of a moment in our eternal evolution.

Franz Kafka, (1954).  Wedding Preparations in the Country.  London: Secker and Warburg. P. 43

What will be my fate as a writer is very simple. My talent for portraying my dreamlike inner life has thrust all matters into the background; my life has dwindled dreadfully, nor will it cease to dwindle. Nothing else will ever satisfy me.

Franz Kafka, Stanley Corngold, (1986). The Metamorphisis. New York: Bantam Dell. p. xvii

Evil does not exist; once you have crossed the threshold, all is good. Once in another world, you must hold your tongue.

Franz Kafka, (1965).  The Diaries of Franz Kafka, Volume 2.  New York: Schocken Books. p. 205

The most dominant spiritual impulse in Prague issued from the Theosophical movement, founded by Madame Blavatsky, which in the German-speaking world at the time was headed by Rudolph Steiner. Indeed, Kafka began his session with Steiner by claiming that his whole being was yearning toward “Theosophie.” He concluded the session with a vow: he would continue on the personally tortuous path of Theosophy if Steiner told him to do so. Despite Kafka’s ending his March 28 diary entry by describing Steiner picking his nose (and in this way belittling him), the fact remains that Kafka deferred to Steiner’s discourse about clairvoyant and mystical modes of consciousness, aimed at creating a new faith for modern man through direct experience of the divine.  P. 10

June O. Leavitt, (2011).  The Mystical Life of Franz Kafka: Theosophy, Cabala, and the Modern Spiritual Revival.  New York: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, (U.S.A.), promoted the power of the individual.  Emerson can be summarized by this quote: “Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”  He was a powerful influence on the American ideal of individualism.

Devout men, in the endeavor to express their convictions, have used different images to suggest this latent force; as, the light, the seed, the Spirit, the Holy Ghost, the Comforter, the Daemon, the still, small voice, etc., - all indicating its power and its latency. It is serenely above all mediation. In all ages, to all men, it says, I am; and he who hears it feels the impiety of wandering from this revelation to any record or to any rival.  
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1904). The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Lectures and Biographical Sketches.  Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company  p. 96 - 97

If all things are taken away, I have still all things in my relation to the Eternal.  We pretend not to define the way of its access to the private heart. It passes understanding.  
Ibid., p. 98

The Divine Mind imparts itself to the single person: his whole duty is to this rule and teaching.  
Ibid., p. 99

Yourself a new-born bard of the Holy Ghost, — cast behind you all conformity, and acquaint men at first hand with Deity. Look to it first and only, that fashion, custom, authority, pleasure, and money are nothing to you,—are not bandages over your eyes, that you cannot see,—but live with the privilege of the immeasurable mind.  Not too anxious to visit periodically all families and each family in your parish connection, -  when you meet one of these men or women, be to them a divine man; be to them thought and virtue; let their timid aspirations find in you a friend; let their trampled instincts be genially tempted out in your atmosphere; let their doubts know that you have doubted, and their wonder feel that you have wondered. By trusting your own heart, you shall gain more confidence in other men. For all our penny-wisdom, for all our soul destroying slavery to habit, it is not to be doubted that all men have sublime thoughts; that all men value the few real hours of life….. Discharge to men the priestly office, and, present or absent, you shall be followed with their love as by an angel. 
Ibid., p. 559

And what is God? We cannot say, but we see clearly enough. We cannot say, because he is the unspeakable, the immeasurable, the perfect; but we see plain enough in what direction it lies. First, we see plainly that the All is in man: that, as the proverb says, “God comes to see us without bell.”’ … Love, Freedom, Power, these are of God. For all these and much more there is a general nature in which they dwell, or of which they are phases, and this is Spirit. It is essentially vital. The love that is in me, the justice, the truth, can never die, and that is all of me that will not die. All the rest of me is so much death, —my ignorance, my vice, my corporeal pleasure. But I am nothing else than a capacity for justice, truth, love, freedom, power. I can inhale, imbibe them forevermore. They shall be so much to me that I am nothing, they all. Then shall God be all in all. Herein is my Immortality. And the soul affirms with the same assurance I shall live forever, as it affirms Justice shall be forever.  

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edward Waldo Emerson, Waldo Emerson Forbes, (1910).  Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson: with annotations: Volume 4. Boston and New YorkL Houghton Mifflin Co.  pp. 127-128

Ralph Waldo Emerson, (U.S.A.), promoted the power of the individual.  Emerson can be summarized by this quote: “Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”  He was a powerful influence on the American ideal of individualism.

Devout men, in the endeavor to express their convictions, have used different images to suggest this latent force; as, the light, the seed, the Spirit, the Holy Ghost, the Comforter, the Daemon, the still, small voice, etc., - all indicating its power and its latency. It is serenely above all mediation. In all ages, to all men, it says, I am; and he who hears it feels the impiety of wandering from this revelation to any record or to any rival.  

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1904). The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Lectures and Biographical Sketches.  Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company  p. 96 - 97

If all things are taken away, I have still all things in my relation to the Eternal.  We pretend not to define the way of its access to the private heart. It passes understanding.  

Ibid., p. 98

The Divine Mind imparts itself to the single person: his whole duty is to this rule and teaching.  

Ibid., p. 99

Yourself a new-born bard of the Holy Ghost, — cast behind you all conformity, and acquaint men at first hand with Deity. Look to it first and only, that fashion, custom, authority, pleasure, and money are nothing to you,—are not bandages over your eyes, that you cannot see,—but live with the privilege of the immeasurable mind.  Not too anxious to visit periodically all families and each family in your parish connection, -  when you meet one of these men or women, be to them a divine man; be to them thought and virtue; let their timid aspirations find in you a friend; let their trampled instincts be genially tempted out in your atmosphere; let their doubts know that you have doubted, and their wonder feel that you have wondered. By trusting your own heart, you shall gain more confidence in other men. For all our penny-wisdom, for all our soul destroying slavery to habit, it is not to be doubted that all men have sublime thoughts; that all men value the few real hours of life….. Discharge to men the priestly office, and, present or absent, you shall be followed with their love as by an angel. 

Ibid., p. 559

And what is God? We cannot say, but we see clearly enough. We cannot say, because he is the unspeakable, the immeasurable, the perfect; but we see plain enough in what direction it lies. First, we see plainly that the All is in man: that, as the proverb says, “God comes to see us without bell.”’ … Love, Freedom, Power, these are of God. For all these and much more there is a general nature in which they dwell, or of which they are phases, and this is Spirit. It is essentially vital. The love that is in me, the justice, the truth, can never die, and that is all of me that will not die. All the rest of me is so much death, —my ignorance, my vice, my corporeal pleasure. But I am nothing else than a capacity for justice, truth, love, freedom, power. I can inhale, imbibe them forevermore. They shall be so much to me that I am nothing, they all. Then shall God be all in all. Herein is my Immortality. And the soul affirms with the same assurance I shall live forever, as it affirms Justice shall be forever.  

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edward Waldo Emerson, Waldo Emerson Forbes, (1910).  Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson: with annotations: Volume 4. Boston and New YorkL Houghton Mifflin Co.  pp. 127-128

Pythagoras, (Greece). In his A History of Western Philosophy, Bertrand Russell argues that Pythagoras had a major influence on Plato, and that Plato is the most influential philosopher of all philosophers, ancient, medieval, or modern.

Would you, great God, the father of mankind,
Reveal the spirit’s voice for that task assigned,
The wretched race an end of woes would find.
And yet be bold, 0 man, divine thou art,
And of the gods, celestial essence part.
Nor sacred Nature is from thee concealed,
But to thy race her mystic rules revealed.
These if to know thou happily attain,
Soon shall you perfect be in all that I ordain. 
Thy wounded soul to health shall be restored,
And free from every pain she felt before.
Pythagoras (1732). The golden verses of Pythagoras. London: Nicholas Rowe. p. 464

“Without light (illumination, or enlightenment) nothing is to be uttered concerning God.”
J. GILCHRIST LAWSON (1911). Deeper Experiences OF FAMOUS CHRISTIANS, Gleaned from Their Biographies, Autobiographies and Writings. Anderson, Indiana: THE WARNER PRESS. pp. 49-50

Enforce thyself to know GOD and to fear him.
It is a right honorable and blessed thing to serve GOD and to sanctify his saints.
The worship of GOD consists not in words but in works.
Worship GOD with a clean heart, pray unto him, and he will advance you.
The time and riches are best bestowed, that are employed about the service of GOD.
It is wisdom to love GOD. For he that loves GOD, does that which GOD loves; which whoever does, shall be sure to be beloved of GOD.

William Baldwin – 1555 A.D. (1908). The Sayings of the Wise; or, Food for Thought. London: Elliot Stock. p. 82-84

Pythagoras, (Greece). In his A History of Western Philosophy, Bertrand Russell argues that Pythagoras had a major influence on Plato, and that Plato is the most influential philosopher of all philosophers, ancient, medieval, or modern.

Would you, great God, the father of mankind,

Reveal the spirit’s voice for that task assigned,

The wretched race an end of woes would find.

And yet be bold, 0 man, divine thou art,

And of the gods, celestial essence part.

Nor sacred Nature is from thee concealed,

But to thy race her mystic rules revealed.

These if to know thou happily attain,

Soon shall you perfect be in all that I ordain. 

Thy wounded soul to health shall be restored,

And free from every pain she felt before.

Pythagoras (1732). The golden verses of Pythagoras. London: Nicholas Rowe. p. 464

“Without light (illumination, or enlightenment) nothing is to be uttered concerning God.”

J. GILCHRIST LAWSON (1911). Deeper Experiences OF FAMOUS CHRISTIANS, Gleaned from Their Biographies, Autobiographies and Writings. Anderson, Indiana: THE WARNER PRESS. pp. 49-50

Enforce thyself to know GOD and to fear him.

It is a right honorable and blessed thing to serve GOD and to sanctify his saints.

The worship of GOD consists not in words but in works.

Worship GOD with a clean heart, pray unto him, and he will advance you.

The time and riches are best bestowed, that are employed about the service of GOD.

It is wisdom to love GOD. For he that loves GOD, does that which GOD loves; which whoever does, shall be sure to be beloved of GOD.

William Baldwin – 1555 A.D. (1908). The Sayings of the Wise; or, Food for Thought. London: Elliot Stock. p. 82-84